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Breonna Taylor won’t get ‘true justice’ until officers are fired or convicted, protesters say

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Breonna Taylor won't get 'true justice' until officers are fired or convicted, protesters say

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Protesters who’ve spent more than 110 days calling for justice for Breonna Taylor said a $12 million settlement that includes several police reforms is a step toward closure for the city and the 26-year-old’s family.

But they won’t be satisfied until the officers who shot and killed the unarmed Black woman are fired and criminally charged in relation to her death, several protesters said following the announcement.

“Yes, it’s a pretty decent settlement. Breonna’s family deserves that and a million times more,” said Delaney Haley, a community organizer who has been a regular at local protests.

“But we won’t have true justice until the cops who did that have to face some kind of repercussions. Fire, arrest, indict, convict. It’s just that simple.”

The demand has remained consistent since protests began in Louisville on May 28, more than two months after Taylor was killed during a failed narcotics investigation at her south Louisville apartment.

Minute by minute: What happened the night Louisville police fatally shot Breonna Taylor

And several protesters said any settlement seems like a “slap in the face” as long as officers involved in Taylor’s death remain on the city’s payroll.

Officer Bret Hankison was fired in June for his role in the shooting. However, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and officer Myles Cosgrove, who also fired shots at Taylor’s home, as well as Detective Joshua Jaynes, who applied for a “no-knock” search warrant at her address, remain on administrative reassignment.

“It still does not give closure to that mother who wakes up every day knowing that the men who killed her daughter are getting paid off the backs of taxpayers,” said Shemaeka Shaw, founder of Broken Hearted Homes Renters Association, a community organization that works to prevent evictions.

“… (Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer) could have fired them a long time ago and worried about court cases down the line.”

City officials and attorneys for Taylor’s family announced the settlement during a press conference Tuesday, where Fischer laid out a series of reforms around search warrants, community relations and police accountability.

The reforms include establishing a housing credit program that incentivizes officers to live within certain low-income census tracts; retaining social workers to support and assist officers on dispatched runs; and requiring a commanding officer to review and approve all search warrants before an officer seeks judicial approval.

Tyra Walker, a special education teacher who co-chairs the Kentucky Alliance Against Racial and Political Repression, said she’s happy the city will hire mental health specialists to work within the police department. But more reforms and community input are needed if Louisville wants to fully improve equality within its criminal justice system, she said.

“We will continue to push for policy change because if we don’t change the policies, we will be back here fighting the same fight 50 years from now, if not sooner,” Walker said. “… A change is going to come, and it is going to be a long fight and hard work. And I’m willing to put in that work.”

During the press conference, attorneys representing Taylor’s family and other speakers agreed that the reforms in the settlement are just one step toward achieving justice for Taylor.

But without any reforms, attorney Lonita Baker said a settlement between the city and Taylor’s family was “non-negotiable.”

“We recognize that this reform is not all-encompassing and there’s still work to be done,” Baker said. “We commit our time, our talent and our resources to continue to work with the community to fight the systemic racism plague in our city.”

Fact check: Debunking 8 widely shared rumors in the Breonna Taylor police shooting

Haley agreed the reforms are a good start toward improving the police department. But she said she’s wary of incremental changes to a system that was designed to “oppress people of color.”

“Reforms in such a biased, corrupt system, it sounds good, but we’ve kind of seen these things happen before where they may be doled out to pacify people,” she said. “I’m hoping that’s not the case with this. I hope it’s true reform and makes a large difference in the community. I guess we’ll see.”

Follow reporter Bailey Loosemore on Twitter: @bloosemore.

This article originally appeared on Louisville Courier Journal: Breonna Taylor settlement is just one step to justice, protesters say

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Germany pays tribute to victims of 1980 Oktoberfest bombing

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Germany Oktoberfest Attack Memorial

BERLIN (AP) — Senior officials and survivors paid tribute Saturday to the victims of a deadly neo-Nazi attack on Munich’s Oktoberfest 40 years ago, as Germany’s president warned that far-right extremism remains a persistent problem in the country.

The bombing on the evening of Sept. 26, 1980, claimed 13 lives, including that of three children and the attacker, student Gundolf Koehler, a supporter of a banned far-right group. More than 200 people were wounded.

“Right-wing extremism has deep roots in our society,” President Frank-Walter Steinmeier said at a memorial event in the Bavarian capital. Germany has seen a number of further attacks inspired by anti-Semitism, hatred of foreigners and neo-Nazi ideology in recent years, including a series of far-right killings that police initially attributed to migrant gangs.

Steinmeier said the perpetrators weren’t “disturbed people,” but rather part of “networks that we need to investigate.”

An initial investigation of the Oktoberfest attack concluded that Koehler acted alone, out of personal frustration. But in 2014, federal prosecutors revisited the case after a previously unknown witness surfaced.

In July, prosecutors said the witness’ indications that there may have been co-conspirators hadn’t been corroborated, but that it was clear Koehler had been motivated by far-right extremism. Victims’ lawyers say there are still many unanswered questions about the attack.

Bavaria’s governor, Markus Soeder, apologized to survivors and the victims’ families for mistakes made during the initial investigation.

Earlier this week, the German government announced it was setting up a 1.2 million-euro ($1.4 million) fund to help survivors of the attack.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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J.C. Penney Losses Deepen

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J.C. Penney Losses Deepen

It's taking longer than expected to finalize a reorganization plan.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Florida drops Covid restrictions with 14,000 dead

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Florida drops Covid restrictions with 14,000 dead

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis Friday scrapped Covid-19 restrictions on bars and restaurants the same day the US state saw 122 deaths topping 14,000 dead.

The executive order signed by DeSantis, a close Republican ally of President Donald Trump, “removes state-level restrictions on businesses, such as restaurants.”

Floridians and business owners need “certainty and the ability to provide for themselves and their families,” the order reads in part.

It says that restaurants may not be limited by any local government COVID-19 emergency order “to less than 50 percent of their indoor capacity.”

The order also ends the collection of all outstanding fines and penalties relating to Covid-19 restrictions.

“In the state of Florida everybody has a right to work, DeSantis told reporters in St. Petersburg, where he announced the measure.

Florida is one of the epicenters of the novel coronavirus pandemic in the United States. There have been nearly 700,000 cases of Covid-19 and more than 14,000 have died from the virus, according to the state Department of Health.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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