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Fantasy Injury Updates: James Conner, Phillip Lindsay, Miles Sanders affect Week 2 waiver pickups

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Fantasy Injury Updates: James Conner, Phillip Lindsay, Miles Sanders affect Week 2 waiver pickups

James Conner’s injuries frustrated fantasy owners for most of last season, and it looks like the injury bug has returned in 2020. Benny Snell Jr. shone in his absence and will be a popular waiver wire target. That’s not the only RB injury we’re watching heading into Week 2 – Phillip Lindsay was also hurt Monday night, and the Eagles’ backfield has both Miles Sanders and Boston Scott with some question marks heading into a matchup with the Rams. Impacts on players like Melvin Gordon and Corey Clement could mean changes in our running back rankings as the week goes on and we hear more news on these injuries.

For all the latest fantasy injury news and updates, check back here and on Twitter @SN_Fantasy

WEEK 2 STANDARD RANKINGS:
Quarterback | Running back | Wide receiver | Tight end | D/ST | Kicker

James Conner injury update

Conner didn’t see the field Monday night after the Steelers’ first three drives. Before leaving the game, he had six carries for nine yards and two catches for eight yards, struggling to find any room to run. Steelers coach Mike Tomlin only said after the game that Conner is being “evaluated.” The ESPN broadcast reported that Conner was dealing with a left ankle injury.

In the past, Conner has dealt with AC joint issues in his right shoulder and issues with his right leg but no reported left ankle injuries before last night. Benny Snell Jr. came on in relief and rushed for 113 yards on 19 carries. Conner’s status likely won’t become clearer until later in the week, but in the meantime, Snell is a solid waiver pickup for Week 2 and a must-add for Conner owners.

MORE: Best Week 2 waiver pickups

Phillip Lindsay injury news

Lindsay carried seven times Monday night for 24 yards before exiting the game and not returning. ESPN’s Adam Schefter reported that Lindsay is dealing with a mild turf toe. Denver next takes on a strong Pittsburgh defense, which stifled Saquon Barkley in Week 1.

Melvin Gordon dominated backfield work for the Broncos after Lindsay’s departure after being in a timeshare with Lindsay in the early portions of the game. Gordon warrants flex consideration, even against the Steelers, if Lindsay is out. If both backs play, they’re risky even as flex plays. Royce Freeman will be Gordon’s handcuff if Lindsay misses time, and he could see enough snaps — and targets — to merit some attention in PPR leagues.

WEEK 2 PPR RANKINGS:
Quarterback | Running back | Wide receiver | Tight end | D/ST | Kicker

Will Miles Sanders play Week 2?

NBC Sports reported Monday that there’s a “decent hope” that Sanders (hamstring) plays in Week 2. Sanders missed Week 1 due to the injury, and the Philadelphia rushing attack struggled accordingly. Philly takes on Aaron Donald and the Rams in Week 2.

Even if Sanders makes it back to the field next week, he could be on a snap count as he works back from his nagging hamstring injury. Against the Rams, Sanders fits more as a flex play than anything more. If Sanders remains out, it will be Boston Scott (if healthy) and Corey Clement serving as speculative flex plays.

Boston Scott injury update

Scott left Sunday’s game with an undisclosed injury and went to the locker room, but he later returned to the field, and nothing further has been reported on his health. Scott ran nine times for 35 yards and caught two passes for 19 yards in Week 1 after being a popular sleeper with Sanders out.

Scott’s lack of involvement in the passing game was a bit surprising in Week 1, although maybe he’ll find more room there if given the chance against the Rams in Week 2. If Sanders is out, Scott is a flex play in all leagues, although a stronger one in PPR formats.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Robert Kraft’s Sex-for-cash case dropped by prosecutors

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Robert Kraft's Sex-for-cash case dropped by prosecutors

The sex-for-cash case against New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft has been dropped, Florida court documents confirm.

The documents, filed in Palm Beach County, include notices from prosecutors stating they are not willing to move forward with the two misdemeanor soliciting prostitution charges against him, NBC News reports.

Dave Aronberg, the county’s State Attorney, has scheduled a press conference on the case for 2:30 p.m.

Prosecutors had first tipped their hand on Monday, when they said they would not challenge an appeals court ruling that had significantly weakened their case by banning them from using secretly-obtained incriminating surveillance video.

The appeals court ruling found that the surveillance video — which allegedly showed him paying for sex acts at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, violated Kraft’s right to privacy.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Jets down to ‘whoever’s got a pulse’ with Jamison Crowder doubtful

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Jets down to ‘whoever’s got a pulse’ with Jamison Crowder doubtful

The Jets have reached the looking-for-warm-bodies stage of their injury crisis, especially at wide receiver.

As they prepare for Sunday’s game against the Colts, the Jets’ injury list is only growing longer. And it doesn’t appear that Sam Darnold will be getting any relief at receiver, with Denzel Mims (IR, hamstring) and Breshad Perriman (ankle) already ruled out and Jamison Crowder (hamstring) trending toward joining them as coach Adam Gase tabbed him “doubtful” Thursday before he was set to miss another practice.

“We’re down to whoever’s available, whoever’s got a pulse right now, we’re ready to go,” Gase said.

Gase didn’t want to completely rule out Crowder just yet, but the veteran still hasn’t practiced since last Wednesday, when he was limited.

“You can common sense it if you want, I’m just not going to close the door on him if for some reason he feels like he’s feeling a lot better in the next two days,” Gase said. “But I would say it’s doubtful.”

That would leave Darnold with Chris Hogan, Braxton Berrios and Josh Malone as his top three receivers Sunday. Gase indicated undrafted rookie Lawrence Cager could be called up from the practice squad this week to provide another option.

The Jets are also in danger of playing Sunday without two of their regular starters on the offensive line. Center Connor McGovern was already missing practice this week because of a hamstring injury, but right tackle George Fant joined him on the sideline Thursday after entering the concussion protocol due to a collision in Wednesday’s practice. Chuma Edoga would replace Fant if he is unable to go.

Also set to miss Thursday’s Jets practice: RB Frank Gore (rest), DL Steve McLendon (COVID testing), CB Quincy Wilson (concussion) and S Ashtyn Davis (groin).

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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How much money do NFL referees make? Salaries & pay structure for game officials in 2020

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How much money do NFL referees make? Salaries & pay structure for game officials in 2020

The NFL naturally prefers to focus on the good that comes from its officiating department. According to the league, “game officials are typically accurate on 98.9 percent of calls.”

Regardless of whether that ambitious number is accurate, it’s the 1.1 percent of calls that are missed that make NFL viewers wonder how much the referees and other game officials are paid.

NFL officiating is a thankless job, but referees, umpires, down judges, line judges, field judges, side judges and back judges make pretty good money considering their pro football jobs are part-time gigs. For two years from 2017-18, the NFL had a program in place that made roughly 20 percent of its officiating roster full-time league employees. But that program was abandoned last year, so all 119 NFL game officials in 2020 are part-time employees.

MORE: Here are the NFL’s highest paid players in 2020

Because all NFL referees and officials are part-time employees, they’re forced into a dark period from the end of each season through mid-May. Of course, they’re essentially full-time workers during the season.

Some argue the NFL making all game officials full-time paid employees would improve the quality of the league’s officiating, with the theory being connected to the value of year-round training. Others argue full-time employment is not essential because the best way to perfect the craft of NFL officiating is in-game experience.

Below is everything else you need to know about how much money NFL referees and other game officials make in 2020, plus a complete roster of this year’s NFL officials and their on-field responsibilities.

How much money do NFL referees make?

The amount of money NFL referees and other game officials make is undisclosed, but we have a good idea based on the pay figures in the recently expired collective bargaining agreement between the NFL and the NFL Referees Association.

NFL officials earned an average of $205,000 for the season in 2019. According to Football Zebras, the new CBA the league and the refs agreed upon last September included “a “substantial bump in game checks and an increased contribution from the NFL into 401(k) retirement plans.”

According to Money Magazine, that $205,000 average included “a base rate plus a certain amount of money per game.” Reports indicate the pay structure in the new CBA is set up the same way.

For what it’s worth, the average annual earnings ($205k) of NFL officials last year, the last of the previous CBA, was up from an average of $149,000 from the last year of the CBA that expired in 2011.

Referees naturally make the most among the seven positions of on-field officials, but the rest of the pay breakdown is unknown.

NFL referees, officials in 2020

The NFL in July announced its official roster of 119 game officials for the 2020 season. The roster includes three former NFL players in back judge Steve Freeman, field judge Nate Jones and umpire Terry Killens.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, NFL game officiating crews in 2020 are assigned to games based on geography in an effort to limit travel. The NFL typically ensures that officials don’t work a game involving the same team more than twice in a season with usually at least six weeks between such games. Those guidelines are being waived this year.

Five on-field officials — Jeff Bergman, Steve Freeman, Greg Gautreaux, Joe Larrew and Tony Steratore — elected to take a leave of absence for the 2020 season amid the pandemic.

Below is the complete roster of all 119 NFL game officials for 2020.

No. Name Pos. College Crew Years of experience
122 Brad Allen R Pembroke State Allen 7
20 Barry Anderson U North Carolina State Allen 14
108 Gary Arthur LJ Wright State Martin 24
72 Michael Banks FJ Illinois State Clark 19
56 Allen Baynes SJ Auburn Hussey 13
59 Rusty Baynes LJ Auburn-Montgomery Boger 11
32 Jeff Bergman LJ Robert Morris Kemp 29
91 Jerry Bergman DJ Robert Morris Blakeman 19
33 Tra Blake FJ UCF Corrente 1
34 Clete Blakeman R Nebraska Blakeman 13
57 Joe Blubaugh FJ Pittsburg State Boger 1
23 Jerome Boger R Morehouse Boger 17
40 Brian Bolinger LJ Indiana State Clark 4
74 Derick Bowers DJ East Central Novak 18
98 Greg Bradley LJ Tennessee Hochuli 12
43 Terry Brown FJ Tennessee Wrolstad 15
11 Fred Bryan U Northern Iowa Martin 12
86 Jimmy Buchanan SJ South Carolina State Blakeman 12
134 Ed Camp DJ William Paterson Hochuli 21
63 Mike Carr DJ Wisconsin Kemp 4
60 Gary Cavaletto SJ Hancock Vinovich 18
41 Boris Cheek SJ Morgan State Corrente 25
51 Carl Cheffers R California-Irvine Cheffers 21
130 Land Clark R Sevier Valley Tech Clark 3
16 Kevin Codey DJ Western New England Torbert 6
95 James Coleman SJ Arkansas Hochuli 16
65 Walt Coleman IV LJ Southern Methodist Novak 6
99 Tony Corrente R Cal State-Fullerton Corrente 26
25 Ryan Dickson FJ Utah Torbert 4
123 Mike Dolce LJ Grand Valley State Allen 1
76 Alan Eck U Bloomsburg Hussey 5
96 Matt Edwards BJ Western Michigan Cheffers 3
3 Scott Edwards SJ Alabama Torbert 22
81 Roy Ellison U Savannah State Hill 18
61 Keith Ferguson BJ San Jose State Hill 21
64 Dan Ferrell U Cal State-Fullerton Corrente 18
71 Ruben Fowler U Huston-Tillotson Hochuli 15
88 Brad Freeman BJ Mississippi State Hussey 7
133 Steve Freeman BJ Mississippi State Kemp 20
80 Greg Gautreaux FJ Southwest Louisiana Blakeman 19
128 Ramon George U Lenoir-Rhyne Novak 5
103 Eugene Hall SJ North Texas Cheffers 7
49 Rich Hall U Arizona Kemp 17
107 Dave Hawkshaw SJ Justice Institute of B.C. Smith 2
93 Scott Helverson BJ Iowa Wrolstad 18
29 Adrian Hill R Buffalo Hill 11
125 Chad Hill SJ Mississippi Boger 3
97 Tom Hill FJ Carson Newman Hochuli 22
28 Mark Hittner DJ Pittsburg State Smith 24
83 Shawn Hochuli R Claremont Hochuli 7
106 Patrick Holt DJ North Carolina State Boger 2
35 John Hussey R Idaho State Hussey 19
36 Anthony Jeffries FJ Alabama-Birmingham Hill 3
117 John Jenkins FJ St. Mary’s Kemp 7
101 Carl Johnson LJ Nicholls State Hussey 17
42 Nate Jones FJ Rutgers Cheffers 2
67 Tony Josselyn BJ Eastern Kentucky Torbert 3
55 Alex Kemp R Central Michigan Kemp 7
77 Terry Killens U Penn State Torbert 2
121 Paul King U Nichols College Clark 12
21 Jeff Lamberth SJ Texas A&M Wrolstad 19
44 Frank LeBlanc DJ Lamar Institute of Technology Vinovich 1
2 Bart Longson LJ Brigham Young Smith 6
10 Julian Mapp LJ Grambling State Blakeman 12
19 Clay Martin R Oklahoma Baptist Martin 6
39 Rich Martinez BJ Canisius Hochuli 7
8 Dana McKenzie DJ Toledo Corrente 13
48 Jim Mello DJ Northeastern Allen 17
118 Dave Meslow FJ Augsburg Martin 10
78 Greg Meyer BJ TCU Clark 19
115 Tony Michalek U Indiana Rogers 19
111 Terrence Miles BJ Arizona State Novak 13
120 Jonah Monroe SJ Arkansas Novak 6
92 Bryan Neale U Indiana Smith 7
1 Scott Novak R Phoenix Novak 7
24 David Oliver DJ Baker Hill 4
124 Carl Paganelli U Michigan State Boger 22
105 Dino Paganelli BJ Aquinas Smith 15
46 Perry Paganelli BJ Hope Blakeman 23
17 Steve Patrick BJ Jacksonville State Vinovich 7
15 Rick Patterson FJ Wofford Allen 25
79 Kent Payne DJ Nebraska Wesleyan Rogers 17
131 Mark Pellis U Allegheny Cheffers 7
9 Mark Perlman LJ Salem Vinovich 20
6 Jerod Phillips DJ Northeastern State Martin 5
47 Tim Podraza LJ Nebraska Corrente 13
109 Dyrol Prioleau FJ Johnson C. Smith Smith 14
30 Todd Prukop BJ Cal State-Fullerton Corrente 12
5 Jim Quirk SJ Middlebury Hill 11
18 Clay Reynard SJ UC Davis Martin 1
31 Mearl Robinson FJ Air Force Vinovich 4
126 Brad Rogers R Lubbock Christian Rogers 4
82 Jimmy Russell SJ Pasco Hernando State Allen 2
50 Aaron Santi FJ Southern Oregon Rogers 6
45 Jeff Seeman LJ Minnesota Cheffers 19
104 Dale Shaw SJ Allegheny Kemp 8
113 Danny Short DJ UNC-Charlotte Cheffers 4
110 Tab Slaughter U Arkansas State Blakeman 1
14 Shawn Smith R Ferris State Smith 6
12 Greg Steed BJ Howard Rogers 18
84 Mark Steinkerchner LJ Akron Torbert 27
68 Tom Stephan DJ Pittsburg State Clark 22
112 Tony Steratore BJ California, Pa. Boger 21
75 Mark Stewart LJ Pittsburg State Hill 3
102 Bruce Stritesky U Embry Riddle Vinovich 15
37 Tripp Sutter LJ Nebraska Wrolstad 2
100 Tom Symonette LJ Florida Rogers 17
53 Sarah Thomas DJ Mobile Hussey 6
62 Ronald Torbert R Michigan State Torbert 11
13 Patrick Turner DJ Cal State-Long Beach Wrolstad 7
52 Bill Vinovich R San Diego Vinovich 15
26 Jabir Walker FJ Murray State Hussey 6
7 Keith Washington SJ Virginia Military Institute Clark 13
116 Mike Weatherford FJ Oklahoma State Novak 19
58 Don Willard SJ Illinois State Rogers 3
119 Greg Wilson BJ USC Martin 13
54 Steve Woods U Wabash Wrolstad 4
4 Craig Wrolstad R Washington Wrolstad 18
38 Greg Yette BJ Howard Allen 11

NFL referees & officials assignments

Each of the seven NFL officials on the field in a given NFL game have specific roles, watching different areas of the field and looking out for different kinds of penalties on a given play.

Below are the responsibilities of each official, via NFL Operations.

Lining up 10-12 yards behind the line of scrimmage in the offensive backfield, the referee is the white-hat wearing leader of the crew who signals all penalties and is the final authority on all rulings. Below are the referee’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches nap; follows QB until action moves downfield; then follows runner to determine forward progress and position of the ball; determines first downs or if a measurement is necessary.

Pass plays: Shadows QB from drop to release; drops back as the play starts and monitors offensive tackles; turns attention solely to QB as defense approaches; watches for roughing the passer; rules on intentional grounding; makes the decision whether a loose ball is a fumble or incomplete pass.

Special teams: Watches for running into/roughing the kicker.

Lining up next to the referee 10-12 yards behind the line of scrimmage in the offensive backfield, the umpire primarily watches for holding and blocking fouls. He or she also reviews player equipment, counts offensive players on the field and marks off penalty yardage. Below are the umpire’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special teams-plays.

Run plays: Watches for false starts on offensive line; watches for illegal blocks by the offense or any defensive fouls at the line of scrimmage.

Pass plays: Watches for false stars on offensive line; on screens, turns attention to intended receiver to make sure he is able to run his route; watches for blocking penalties.

Special teams: Watches for any penalties.

Lining up on the sideline and looking directly down the line of scrimmage, the down judge directs the chain crew, informs the ref of the down and rules on sideline plays on the nearest half of the field. Below are the down judge’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches for offside or encroachment; monitors sideline; determines when/if a runner is out of bounds; marks runner’s forward progress.

Pass plays: Watches nearest receiver for first seven yards of his route until he is clear the point of legal contact for defensive backs; watches for pass interference.

Special teams: Watches for offside and encroachment; rules on penalties involving blockers and defenders on trick plays.

Lining up on the sideline opposite the down judge and looking directly down the line of scrimmage, the line judge has similar duties without the chain crew direction. Below are the line judge’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches for offside and encroachment; watches blockers and defenders on nearest side for penalties.

Pass plays: Watches for offside and encroachment on nearest side of field; follows nearest receiver for seven yards downfield; moves into offensive backfield to determine if pass is forwards or backwards; makes sure passer is behind the line of scrimmage when he throws the ball.

Special teams: Stays at line of scrimmage on punts to make sure only players on the ends of the line move downfield before the kick; rules on whether the kick crosses the line of scrimmage; watches kicking team for penalties.

Lining up on the same sideline as the line judge but 20 yards behind the line of scrimmage in the defensive backfield, the field judge counts defensive players and watches wide receivers/defensive backs on the nearest side of the field. Below are the field judge’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches widest receiver’s blocking and looks for illegal use of hands or holding; determines if/when a runner on nearest side of the field goes out of bounds.

Pass plays: Watches widest receiver on nearest side of the field and makes sure he is able to run his route without interference; rules on whether a pass to nearest side of the field is incomplete; rules on whether a receiver is in or out of bounds when he makes a catch; watches for pass interference.

Special teams: Rules on blocking during punts; lines up under goal posts to rule on whether field goals and extra points are good.

Lining up on the same sideline as the down judge but 20 yards behind the line of scrimmage in the defensive backfield, the side judge backs up the clock operator, signals to the ref when time expires for each quarter and counts defensive players. Below are the side judge’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches widest receiver’s blocking and looks for illegal use of hands or holding; determines if/when a runner on nearest side of the field goes out of bounds.

Pass plays: Watches widest receiver on nearest side of the field and makes sure he is able to run his route without interference; rules on whether a pass to nearest side of the field is incomplete; rules on whether a receiver is in or out of bounds when he makes a catch; watches for pass interference.

Special teams: Watches punt returner and any action around him; joins umpire in defensive backfield on field goal and PAT attempts; watches for penalties along the line of scrimmage.

Usually lining up on the tight end’s side, the back judge is positioned 25 yards behind the line of scrimmage in the defensive backfield. The back judge keeps track of the play clock and all TV breaks, counts defensive players and focuses on tight ends and all the players on the end of the lines. Below are the back judge’s assignments on run plays, pass plays and special-teams plays.

Run plays: Watches tight end for illegal blocking or defensive penalties.

Pass plays: Watches tight end for illegal use of hands or defensive interference; rules on whether a receiver made a legal catch; determines who recovered a fumble.

Special teams: Rules on fair catches; lines up under goal posts to rule on whether field goals and extra points are good.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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