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Mekhi Becton’s knee gives Jets another injury concern

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Mekhi Becton’s knee gives Jets another injury concern

The Jets injury list grew longer Wednesday with rookie left tackle Mekhi Becton’s addition.

Becton will be limited in practice after suffering a knee injury during Sunday’s loss to the Bills. Jets coach Adam Gase said Becton injured the knee in the middle of the game but did not want to come out.

“We’re going to be careful here today and see how he feels afterwards,” Gase said.

The fact that Becton is practicing at all indicates the injury is not serious. Becton had a strong debut in Buffalo and has a massive challenge this week against the 49ers and their star pass rusher Nick Bosa.

The Jets placed running back Le’Veon Bell, wide receiver Denzel Mims and linebacker Blake Cashman on IR on Tuesday. That means they will be out for at least three weeks.

Linebacker Avery Williamson (hamstring) will be limited in practice Wednesday. Rookie running back La’Mical Perine (ankle) will not practice.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Henrik Lundqvist was truly ‘The King’ in every way for Rangers

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Henrik Lundqvist was truly 'The King' in every way for Rangers

It isn’t the numbers and it isn’t the number 30 that will be raised to the pinwheel ceiling of the Garden when the time becomes right.

It is the aura, it is the personality, it is the grace and it is the professionalism, competitiveness and, yes, the humanity of Henrik Lundqvist he bequeaths to New York forever now that his days in a Rangers uniform have come to an end.

That is what makes this so heart-wrenching.

“I know we are all facing some challenges as a city so let’s do what New Yorkers do best, come together and get back to where we want to be!” Lundqvist, not quite sticking to sports, said as part of a five-part farewell tweet posted to his account Wednesday. “Be kind, be respectful and supportive of others.”

That is what Lundqvist, the Swede who made himself at home on Broadway, leaves behind. That is who Lundqvist is.

He’s not Derek Jeter. He’s not Eli Manning. He’s not Willis Reed. He’s not Tom Seaver. He doesn’t have the ring(s). But if you want to talk about this particular Core Four, Lundqvist was something else that not one of them was and he carried a burden shared by none of the above.

He was the face of the franchise for the final 14 years of his 15-year career here, the singular name above the title on the marquee and essentially required to be the best player on the ice just about any and every night in order for his team to win. That’s what he was.

Eventually, it took a toll. The amount of work he needed to do on a consistent basis, and certainly over the last five years while often operating behind a defensive structure that seemed to traffic in chaos, wore him down. So did the Cup receding into the background of the rearview mirror. The game became faster, Lundqvist became slower. Or, perhaps more accurately, the King became 35, then 36, then 37, and now 38.

And Rangerstown was no longer a country for old men.

The Rangers were 15-4 in playoff elimination games from 2012-15. That almost seems like a typographical error. It isn’t. Lundqvist allowed one goal or no goals in 11 of those 19 games. The Rangers came from 3-1 down against the Penguins in 2014 and 3-1 down against the Capitals in 2015 and Lundqvist allowed a sum of eight goals in those six potential elimination games.

He was as hard on his teammates as he was on himself and perhaps not every player appreciated that all the time. He was as hard on his teammates, come to think of it, as John Tortorella was on him.

Tortorella treated Lundqvist with tough love. The Swede was better for it. A lot of it was even necessary, but probably not the lecture after a poor outing that coincidentally came on a day the King’s picture with Justin Bieber taken at the Knicks game the previous night showed up on Page Six. I believe the coach prohibited the King from attending Knicks games for the rest of that season.

There was that stretch of seasons when Tortorella gloried in the number of high shots directed at Lundqvist during practice. He thought it toughened up the goaltender. I thought it was absurd. And so, after the second or third time he’d been struck by a high one, I advised Lundqvist to simply leave the net next time, the way Billy Smith often did when he was with the Islanders. I presumed it was a private conversation.

But the next night, in the midst of answering a question in a pregame press briefing, the coach matter of factly let it drop that, “One of our writers even told Hank to stop playing … didn’t think I knew that, did you?”

Who, me?

“You told him?” I asked Lundqvist after the match.

“I shouldn’t have?”

He was laughing.

I wasn’t.

Fifteen years. We talked and we talked and we talked. We talked at morning skates, we talked after games, we talked after practices. I have written thousands and thousands of words about him, more than any other athlete I have ever covered. I don’t know if there has ever been a more gracious star of that magnitude.

Lundqvist came to camp in 2005. After his third NHL game, a 5-1 victory over the Thrashers at the Garden on Oct. 15, I anointed him The King. There was just something about him. “He is King Henrik of Sweden, that’s who he is,” I wrote.

Years later, after the title had become inextricably linked with his identity, Lundqvist wanted to know why I’d bestowed that name upon him. There had, at some point, been a Swedish monarch named Henrik, though he apparently did not rule the land. He knew that.

“It’s because of my name, that’s the reason, right?” he wanted to know. “If my name was Sam, you wouldn’t have called me King Sam, would you?”

Well, yes, I would have.

But he was not Sam.

He was (and is) Henrik Lundqvist.

The King.

One of the best of all time.

And I am going to miss him terribly.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Carlos Correa goads Astros haters after beating Twins: ‘What are they going to say now?’

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Carlos Correa goads Astros haters after beating Twins: 'What are they going to say now?'

Carlos Correa released pent-up frustration Wednesday afternoon after the Astros eliminated the Twins from the playoffs with a 3-1 win, railing against people who have blasted the club for its cheating scandal.

The shortstop, who homered in the victory, seems to believe advancing to the AL division series proves Houston is the same level of contender it was when it brazenly stole signs electronically.

“I know a lot of people are mad, I know a lot of people don’t want to see us here,” Correa said. “But what are they going to say now? We’re a solid team, we play great baseball, we won a series on the road in Minnesota. So what are they going to say now?”

MORE: David Ross criticized for Game 1 mistake

As it turns out, fans still have a lot to say about the Astros. People reacted with anger toward Correa for suggesting his team had exacted revenge on its detractors.

Here’s a sample of Twitter responses to Correa’s comments:

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Who the Yankees would face in MLB playoffs ALDS

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Who the Yankees would face in MLB playoffs ALDS

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Hunter Renfroe hit a grand slam and the top-seeded Tampa Bay Rays won a postseason series for the first time in 12 years, overpowering the young Toronto Blue Jays 8-2 Wednesday to finish a two-game sweep of their AL wild-card matchup.

Renfroe launched the first playoff grand slam in franchise history during a six-run second inning. Tyler Glasnow kept Tampa Bay ahead from there, allowing two runs — on a pair of homers by Danny Jansen — in six innings.

Mike Zunino hit a two-run homer off Blue Jays ace Hyun Jin Ryu during Tampa Bay’s big inning. Manuel Margot and Randy Arozarena also drove in runs as the Rays advanced to the AL Division series against either the New York Yankees or Cleveland Indians.

The next round starts Monday at Petco Park in San Diego. Renfroe is plenty familiar with the stadium — he hit 85 home runs in the previous three years for the Padres before being traded to the Rays last December.

The Rays celebrated with some hugs and handshakes after the final out.

Glasnow, who walked one and struck out eight before a small gathering of family and friends who were allowed to attend the series at Tropicana Field.

Hunter Renfroe belts a grand slam during the Rays' 8-2 wild-card series clinching win over the Blue Jays.
Hunter Renfroe belts a grand slam during the Rays’ 8-2 series clinching win over the Blue Jays.Getty Images

Ryu was rocked for a season-high seven runs in 1 2/3 innings, the lefty’s shortest outing of the season for the wild-card Blue Jays.

The Rays, who won Game 1 with a nice mix of pitching, defense and timely hitting, had dropped five consecutive multigame postseason series dating to the 2008 World Series.

A year ago, they beat Oakland in the AL wild-card game before losing to Houston in the division round — a five-game setback that nevertheless heightened team expectations heading into this season.

Manager Kevin Cash’s team delivered this year, winning the AL East.

Ryu signed with the Blue Jays in free agency last winter after being an All-Star with the Los Angeles Dodgers and finishing second in NL Cy Young Award balloting in 2019.

The 33-year-old lefty had the AL’s fourth-best ERA this season. And, his career mark of .295 is third-best behind Clayton Kershaw (2.43) and Jacob deGrom (2.61) among active pitchers with at least 700 innings pitched.

Ryu’s impressive credentials meant nothing Wednesday.

The Rays began the first inning with three straight hits and scored their first run on Manuel Margot’s one-out single. Ryu escaped a bases-loaded jam by striking out Willy Adames, however his outing got worse the next inning.

After Zunino’s homer made it 3-0, Tampa Bay loaded the bases again on a double, walk and shortstop Bo Bichette’s second error of the day.

Renfroe, obtained from San Diego in an offseason trade that sent Tommy Pham to the Padres, hit his grand slam into the left field seats to extend the lead to 7-0.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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