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Pelosi vows to keep House in session after Dems spike Senate COVID relief deal

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Pelosi vows to keep House in session after Dems spike Senate COVID relief deal

WASHINGTON — Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Tuesday vowed to keep the House in session until a deal is reached on COVID relief — after her own Democrats blocked a $650 billion package offered by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Pressure is mounting on lawmakers to pass desperately needed relief for American families, including another round of $1,200 checks, with 60 million people filing jobless claims during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We have to stay here until we have a bill,” Pelosi told lawmakers on a Tuesday morning House Democratic Caucus conference call, according to multiple reports.

The current session is due to end on Oct. 2, allowing members to campaign in their districts ahead of the Nov. 3 election.

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer clarified that Congressional leadership would stay in town and members would only be called back if a deal was reached.

But aides on both sides of the aisle told The Post they were pessimistic any compromise would be reached before the election — blaming political grandstanding.

Talks between the White House, Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer stalled last month and Democrats last week rejected McConnell’s $650 billion “skinny” bill that included $300 supplements payments to the unemployed.

“That GOP bill was a piece of garbage,” one source familiar with the negotiations told The Post of McConnell’s skinny bill. “There was no funding for state and local governments, no transit, nothing for testing, tracing — nothing.”

But a GOP aide said that McConnell’s bill — which included the crucial $300 unemployment insurance and $105 billion for schools — was perfectly reasonable and should have had bipartisan support.

Democrats have been unwilling to budge on certain issues included in the $3.4 trillion HEROES package they passed in May — including funding for federal and state governments.

Long Island GOP Congressman Lee Zeldin told The Post he believed a deal could be “cut instantly” but said Pelosi’s $900 billion ask for state and federal funding was “holding up a win.”

“Congressional Democrats need to come off their $900 billion ask. It doesn’t pass the smell test. It’s more than what state and local governments are asking for,” he said, adding that the White House had been willing to give $150 billion to this cause.

“The American public demands bipartisan compromise and they want to see progress,” he added.

Frustrated by the impasse, members from the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus unveiled their own COVID relief framework on Tuesday, a $1.5 billion compromise with money for coronavirus testing, state and local aid, another lot of $1,200 stimulus checks, and a $450 per-week boost to unemployment.

“What we’re showing today is a deal is not only possible, but more importantly, a deal must be possible because failure is not an option,” Staten Island Rep. Max Rose, a Democratic member of the caucus, told The Post.

“This isn’t a game. This isn’t a red state or a blue state issue. This is an American issue and we must come together as Americans and get the job done,” said Rose, who is involved in a fierce reelection battle with Republican challenger, Assemblywoman Nicole Malliotakis, in a purple district.

Reports emerged last week of pressure mounting on Pelosi from moderate and vulnerable Democrats to take action nearly four months after the HEROES Act was rejected by the Senate.

Democratic aides rejected that notion and said the caucus was united. One staffer went so far as to say Republicans — and Trump — needed a win much more than they did and claimed the struggling American public would blame Trump for their financial situation.

But it was Trump who acted when negotiations between Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, the White House’s relief point person, broke down in August as the $600-per-week federal unemployment boost ran out.

Amid the impasse between Democrats and Republicans, Trump signed an executive order ensuring that tens of millions of Americans would continue receiving increased benefits at the slightly reduced weekly rate of $400.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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LA cop recovering from bullet grazing the top of his head during shootout

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LA cop recovering from bullet grazing the top of his head during shootout

An LAPD Harbor cop was recovering from an apparent graze wound to the head under circumstances that remained unclear early Sunday.

The shooting injury follows by two weeks the ambush shooting of two Los Angeles County Sheriffs as they sat in their patrol car in Compton, also on a Saturday night.

Both have since been discharged from the hospital.

“We can confirm that there has been an Officer-Involved Shooting at LAPD’S Harbor Station,” the department tweeted just before midnight Saturday, Los Angeles time, without providing more details.

The officer was in stable condition, Police Chief Michel Moore tweeted.

Los Angeles City Councilmember Joe Buscaino tweeted that he was headed to the hospital.

Soon afterward the councilmember told the CBS affiliate in Los Angeles that the officer is expected to be fine after suffering a graze wound to the head.

“This is a reminder of the danger of police work in our city, in our state, in our region,” Buscaino told the station.

“Thankfully, he’s going to be okay.”

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Rochester names first female chief after protests

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Rochester names first female chief after protests

NEW YORK – The mayor of Rochester, New York named the city’s first female police chief on Saturday, weeks after firing the previous chief amid protests over the death of a Black man in police custody.

Cynthia Herriott-Sullivan, a top official at the Rochester Housing Authority who previously served as a city police officer for more than 20 years, takes over as interim head of the police department on Oct. 14, Mayor Lovely Warren said.

“As the first woman to serve in this role, I am confident she will bring a different perspective and instill a fresh approach to policing, which are very much needed in our city at this particular time,” Warren said in a statement.

The mayor fired the last chief, La’Ron Singletary, on Sept. 14 as racial justice demonstrations boiled over the department’s handling of the asphyxiation death in March of Daniel Prude, 41, who was having a psychotic episode when he was arrested.

Warren also suspended without pay for 30 days two city officials amid questions about a possible cover-up of the events around Prude’s death, and has called for a federal investigation into whether Prude’s civil rights were violated.

Video footage, released by Prude’s family, showed officers using a mesh hood and pinning him to the pavement, in a scene reminiscent of George Floyd’s May 25 death in Minneapolis police custody.

Seven Rochester police officers involved in the arrest were suspended on Sept. 3. The medical examiner ruled Prude’s death a homicide by asphyxiation, with the drug PCP a contributing factor.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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NASA astronaut will vote in 2020 presidential election from space

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NASA astronaut will vote in 2020 presidential election from space

Her vote will be out of this world.

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins plans to cast her vote for the 2020 presidential election on the International Space Station — more than 200 miles above the Earth’s surface, according to The Associated Press.

“I think it’s really important for everybody to vote,” said Rubins.

“If we can do it from space, then I believe folks can do it from the ground, too.”

Rubins, who is currently stationed in Star City, Russia, along with two other astronauts, is preparing for her trip into space in October and will complete a six-month stay at the ISS.

She says she won’t let a little thing like low-earth orbit stop her from exercising her right to vote.

“It’s critical to participate in our democracy,” she said.  “We consider it an honor to be able to vote from space.”

Most United States astronauts live in Houston, where election law lets astronauts vote while floating amongst the stars.

Her vote would be cast securely using an electronic ballot relayed to Mission Control, which will then forward it on to the county clerk.

Back in 2016, both Rubins and Shane Kimbrough cast their vote from space.

During her six-month tour on the ISS, Rubins will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the continuous human presence in the space station, as well as welcome the second Space X group, who are set to arrive in late October.

With Post Wires

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