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PS5 Digital Edition launches November 12th for $399.99

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PS5 Digital Edition launches November 12th for $399.99

Sony’s PlayStation 5 Digital Edition, its next-generation game console without a Blu-ray disc drive, will cost $399.99, the company announced Wednesday as part of its PS5 price reveal live stream event.

That’s $100 less than the standard PS5, which will match Microsoft’s Xbox Series S at a price of $499.99 but cost $100 more than the less performant Xbox Series S. Both devices will ship in the US, Japan, and other territories on November 12th, with a worldwide availability on November 19th. We don’t have any info on preorder dates just yet.

It was an open question just how much of a price reduction Sony would offer with its digital edition PS5, considering the lack of a Blu-ray drive could have translated into anywhere from a $50 or more price cut over the standard version of the next-gen console. Now fans have a clear idea of the cost comparisons both between Sony’s devices and Microsoft’s two-tier Xbox Series X / S offering.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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Sonos sues Google for infringing on five more speaker patents

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Sonos sues Google for infringing on five more speaker patents

Just one day before Google’s Pixel 5 reveal, Sonos has filed a new lawsuit against the search giant, alleging it has infringed five more patents. The patents cover technologies that form the basis of some of Sonos’ best-known features, including its Trueplay tuning tool.

The new lawsuit is the latest development in the ongoing legal spat between Sonos and Google. Sonos first sued Google at the start of 2020. It alleged at the time that the company had violated five of its speaker patents, including one that details a technology that allows wireless speakers to sync with one another. In June, Google countersued Sonos, claiming the speaker company had been using its search, software, networking and audio processing technologies without paying a licensing fee.“While Google rarely sues other companies for patent infringement, it must assert its intellectual property rights here,” Google wrote in the complaint.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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Demon’s Souls PS5 remake will include new items, weapons, and armor

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Demon’s Souls PS5 remake will include new items, weapons, and armor

Bluepoint Games’ remake of Demon’s Souls looks to be a mostly faithful recreation of the PlayStation 3 original, based on recently released gameplay footage. But Demon’s Souls for PlayStation 5 won’t be a strict one-to-one remake, based on new details from the game’s digital deluxe version — it will have new items, armor, and weapons that weren’t previously available in the game.

We’ve known about one of those weapons, the Reaper Scythe, which is available as an exclusive pre-order bonus. While that scythe was in the original game — the Reaper in the Shrine of Storms wields it — players couldn’t earn it for themselves. On the PlayStation Blog, Sony Interactive Entertainment creative director Gavin Moore explains that the Reaper Scythe is “a pole weapon with a curved blade on one end that is so sharp that they say it can sever your soul from your body. It can mow down many targets in a single blow, but is difficult to handle and requires both strength and dexterity to use.”

Demon’s Souls’ new additions go beyond that new weapon, however, based on the PS5 game’s listing on PlayStation.com.

Included as part of the Demon’s Souls digital deluxe edition are the following new items:

  • Red-Eye Knight Armor
  • Boletarian Royalty Armor
  • Ritual Blade
  • Hoplite Shield
  • Ring of Longevity
  • Preservation Grains
  • Phosphorescent Grains
  • Bearbug Grains

Some of those new items appear to be new drops from existing enemies, including the Red-Eye Knight’s armor and what appears to be clothing based on Old King Allant’s garb. The Ritual Blade appears to be the giant cleaver used by the Gold Skeleton, while the Hoplite Shield would conceivably drop from Hoplites.

An item called the Ring of Longevity does not exist in the original Demon’s Souls, but one could infer it might act like the Wood Grain Ring from Dark Souls and bolster weapon durability. The three grains are something of a mystery, but the latter two appear tied to the Phosphorescent Slugs and Bearbugs found in Demon’s Souls.

Demon’s Souls will launch day and date with the PlayStation 5 on Nov. 12.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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Internal documents show automated Amazon warehouses have higher injury rates

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Internal documents show automated Amazon warehouses have higher injury rates

Amazon’s warehouses with robots, which the company has claimed would help reduce worker injuries, actually have higher injury rates than warehouses without automation, according to internal Amazon records obtained by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. The stunning fact comes as part of a broader report investigating rising injury rates at Amazon warehouses across the country.

Amazon’s warehouse robots are apparently so efficient that quotas have increased substantially, requiring workers to do repetitive motions over long shifts that can eventually lead to injuries. For example, workers who grab and scan items had their quotas increase from about 100 items an hour to 400 items an hour in the automated warehouses, according to the report. The rise in injury rates suggests automation could actually be creating a more dangerous environment for the workers, despite hopes that robots would take on the most dangerous tasks.

Amazon piloted specific measures recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to help reduce injury risk, such as an extra rest break or rotating workers to other jobs during the day. But the measures have not been widely implemented, and Reveal’s documents indicate that injury rates have continued to rise.

Amazon, in a statement to Reveal, said that “the use of robotics, automation and technology in our fulfillment centers is enhancing our workplace, making jobs safer and more efficient.”

The report shows unusually high rates of injury across the board, even compared with equivalent warehouses run by other companies. Amazon warehouses counted 14,000 serious injuries in 2019 (meaning injuries that require days off or job restrictions), and “the overall rate of 7.7 serious injuries per 100 employees was 33% higher than in 2016 and nearly double the most recent industry standard,” according to the report.

And injury rates spiked during Amazon’s Prime Day and Cyber Monday sales extravaganzas, with the weeks surrounding them having “the highest rate of serious injuries for all of 2019,” Reveal reported.

Reveal has also put together a site where you can browse the injury rates of more than 150 Amazon warehouses from 2016 through 2019, pulled from internal Amazon records. Two sites — one in DuPont, WA and one in Eastvale, CA — reported more than 16 serious injuries per 100 workers in 2019, quadruple the industry average from 2018.

Reveal’s report follows an investigation from November claiming that Amazon attempted to dodge workplace safety regulators for years. And Amazon’s warehouse safety practices have come under particular scrutiny this year as workers have continued to staff the warehouses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Eight known workers have died from COVID-19, and Amazon has declined to say how many warehouse workers have contracted or died from the disease.

Amazon has not responded to an inquiry from The Sports Grind Entertainment about the claims raised in Reveal’s article.

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Devon is a fitness enthusiast who loves playing Golf in his free time. He keeps in touch with the Golf events happening all around the world and jots down fine news pieces for the website.

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