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Razer Kishi controller brings console precision to iPhone games

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Razer Kishi controller brings console precision to iPhone games

Razer is launching the Kishi Universal Gaming Controller for the iPhone. Finally, I’ve got something that gives me an unfair advantage in a Call of Duty game.

It’s a stretchable accessory that can fit most new iPhones, adding game controller analog sticks and buttons to your mobile gaming experience. It connects via the Lightning connector and wraps around the edges of the iPhone.

I used it to play Call of Duty: Mobile. I came in first in two of my first three matches, and in my third match I had 26 kills and one death. It works with Fortnite as well, if you can still play it on your iPhone (some players can do so despite litigation between Epic and Apple, particularly those who don’t have to update the game). And admittedly, maybe there were some bots in my Call of Duty: Mobile battles, but I still did better than usual.

Fortnite in particular is a cross-play game, where mobile players can go up against console and PC players. Usually when that happens, the mobile players get slaughtered because touchscreen controls aren’t as good as a mouse-and-keyboard or gamepad. The Kishi goes a long way toward leveling the playing field.

The Razer Kishi for Android launched earlier this year, and Jeff Grubb played with it.

Above: The Razer Kishi costs $100.

The Kishi has clickable analog thumbsticks, a bunch of face and multi-function buttons, and an 8-way D-pad. The Kishi works with iPhone 6 Plus and newer devices.

The Razer Kishi for iPhone is available now in the Apple Online Store, the first time a Razer product has been featured on the site. It will be available at select Apple stores worldwide on September 22. The design is pretty comfortable, and it made me feel like I was playing with a Nintendo Switch, except with Xbox-like controls. It has passthrough charging so you can the iPhone by hooking a charging cable to the controller.

It worked better than other mobile game controller solutions. I’ve used the Rotor Riot wired gamepad, which is a regular game controller that plugs into the Lightning jack via a cable. But it didn’t feel quite as natural as the Kishi. I’ve also used Sentons virtual buttons on the Lenovo Legion Android gaming phone. I’ll write more about the Sentons solution later, but the Kishi does the job better.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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FBI opens civil rights investigation into fatal 2018 police shooting of Kansas teenager

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FBI opens civil rights investigation into fatal 2018 police shooting of Kansas teenager

Federal authorities have opened a civil rights investigation into the fatal police shooting of a Kansas teenager during a wellness check in 2018.

The FBI will “collect all available facts and evidence and will ensure that the investigation is conducted in a fair, thorough and impartial manner,” spokeswoman Bridget Patton told USA TODAY in a statement Monday. The bureau’s Kansas City, Missouri, field office is working with the Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division and the U.S. attorney’s office in Kansas on the investigation.

Former Overland Park officer Clayton Jenison shot and killed John Albers, 17, in January 2018 after the teen’s friends called police to report he was making suicidal comments. As Albers backed out of his family’s garage in a minivan toward Jenison, the officer yelled at him to stop and then fired 13 times.

More: A mom called 911 to help her 13-year-old with autism, Utah police shot him

Pamela Turner shooting: Texas officer indicted on assault charge

The Johnson County District Attorney later ruled the shooting was justified because Jenison feared for his life.

Albers’ family settled a wrongful death lawsuit against the city for $2.3 million after the shooting. Jenison received $70,000 as part of a severance package when he agreed to resign, according to city officials.

Sheila Albers told the Kansas City Star she is thankful the FBI has reopened the case and accused local officials of presenting a false narrative about her son’s death.

“The FBI investigation highlights the failure of Overland Park and District Attorney Steve Howe to be transparent in their investigations and be accountable to their constituents,” Sheila Albers said.

Overland Park spokesman Sean Reilly told USA TODAY the city will “fully cooperate with all investigations into the 2018 shooting of John Albers, just as we cooperated with the investigations conducted by the Johnson County District Attorney’s office and the Kansas Commission on Peace Officers’ Standards.”

The investigation comes amid a national conversation about how police officers respond to calls regarding individuals having a mental health crisis. Nationwide, advocates are calling for change following the police shooting of a 13-year-old boy with autism in Utah and the death of Daniel Prude, a Black man who was suffering from acute mental health problems when he died in police custody in New York.

What we know about Daniel Prude’s death: Police used ‘spit hood’ on Black man who died of asphyxiation

Contributing: The Associated Press

Follow N’dea Yancey-Bragg on Twitter: @NdeaYanceyBragg

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: FBI opens civil rights investigation for police killing of Kansas teen

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Coronavirus update: World nears 1M deaths; Inovio delays late-stage trial as vaccine race quickens

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Coronavirus update: World nears 1M deaths; Inovio delays late-stage trial as vaccine race quickens

The coronavirus pandemic neared a grim new milestone of 1 million deaths on Monday, as new diagnoses in the around the world continue to outpace a slowdown in the rate of fatalities.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Alabama city removes Confederate monument following vote

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Alabama city removes Confederate monument following vote

ANNISTON, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama city has removed a 115-year-old Confederate monument following a vote by city leaders that was prompted by the national reckoning over racial injustice and the legacy of the Civil War.

Workers with the city of Anniston began removing the stone obelisk from the grassy median of a busy avenue late Sunday, city spokesman Jackson Hodges said Monday, and the work only took about 20 minutes.

The City Council voted 4-1 earlier this month to take down the monument to Confederate artillery officer John Pelham, who was from nearby Alexandria and died in battle in 1863.

The memorial, which was erected in 1905 while Southern heritage groups were promoting a version of Civil War history that cast the Southern cause as noble, will be taken to a Confederate history park. An inscription on the base referred to Pelham as “gallant” and beloved.

City spokesman Jackson Hodges said the obelisk was taken down late at night to prevent traffic problems on the main road through the city.

“It wasn’t to pull a fast one on the community,” he said.

Located about 65 miles (104 kilometers) east of Birmingham, the city of roughly 22,000 people is about 52% Black.

The removal came during a national reckoning of Confederate symbols that followed the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May. Mayor Jack Draper said he put the removal on the council’s agenda in June after hearing from multiple residents on both sides.

“And I think, given where we are right now, with a heightened focus on racial and social injustice, now is the time to actually debate this issue,” Draper told WBRC-TV in June.

The Birmingham suburb of Pelham is named for Pelham, who also was the namesake of an artillery range at the Army’s Fort McClellan in Anniston.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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