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Vipshop Holdings Limited’s (NYSE:VIPS) Price In Tune With Earnings

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3 “Perfect 10” Dividend Stocks Yielding at Least 5%

Assessing where the markets will go can sometimes seem like more art than science, and an arcane art at that. But the data is out there to make sense of the stock movements.The TipRanks Smart Score is a perfect example. Scanning through the whole of the database, and assembling the information for every stock according to 8 categories known to predict future share performance, the Smart Score combines those categories into a single score that allows investors to see at a glance how the stock is likely to move in the coming year.That score is given on a scale from 1 to 10, with low scores indicating likely underperformance of the broader market, and higher scores indicating overperformance. A perfect score, a 10, is a rare gift for a stock. It doesn’t necessarily mean that every factor aligns perfectly – but it does indicate a potentially bright future for the stock in question.Today, we’ve pulled up three ‘Perfect 10’ stocks, which are also fine defensive plays, with dividends yielding 5% or higher. At a time when volatility is returning to the markets, the combination of likely overperformance and a strong dividend return makes these stocks that investors should take notice of.AT&T, Inc. (T)The first stock on the list needs no introduction, as it is a blue-chip standby of the S&P 500 index. AT&T is giant by any standard: the world’s largest telecom company, the US’ largest provider of mobile and landline phone services, and an emerging player in the content streaming business.Telecommunications products became even more important than usual during the ‘corona half’ of 2020, and AT&T saw comparatively moderate losses in Q1 and Q2. EPS came in at 84 and 83 cents for the quarters, compared to 89 cents in 4Q19. Revenues, at $41 billion in Q2, were down 12% from the end of last year. In short, the company took a hit, but remains solidly profitable.AT&T used those profits, in part, to keep up the dividend payment. The company has a reputation as a dividend champion, with 17 years of reliable payments behind it and a penchant for high yields. The current dividend is 52 cents per share quarterly and was paid out in August. At $2.08 annualized, this dividend offers investors a yield of 7.14%. That’s more than triple ~2% found among T’s S&P peers.Ivan Feinseth, 5-star analyst with Tigress Financial, writes of AT&T, “The resiliency of AT&T’s wireless business should continue to produce positive near-term Business Performance and should continue to accelerate as the economy recovers […] The ongoing 5G rollout, together with AT&T’s ability to leverage its entertainment assets for an extremely high dividend yield, will drive long-term shareholder value creation, making the shares a compelling value…”The resiliency of AT&T’s wireless business should continue to produce positive near-term Business Performance and should continue to accelerate as the economy recovers.Feinseth does not set a specific price target, but he does rate the stock a Buy. (To watch Feinseth’s track record, click here)AT&T has 11 analyst ratings, split among 7 Buys, 3 Holds, and 1 Sell. This gives the stock a Moderate Buy from the analyst consensus. Shares are selling for $29.12, and the $33.78 average price target suggests it has a 16% one-year upside potential. (See AT&T stock analysis on TipRanks)Physicians Realty Trust (DOC)Next on today’s list is Physicians Realty Trust, a real estate investment trust that focuses on the acquisition, development, and management of healthcare properties. The properties are leased to healthcare delivery systems, hospitals, and physician practices. The company has a portfolio of properties across the lower 48 states, and boasts a market cap of nearly $3.85 billion.During a pandemic crisis, owning a network of clinics and hospitals is an obvious asset. DOC bears this out in its 1H20 quarterly reports. The company reported 26 and 27 cents EPS in Q1 and Q2, in line with the results from 2019. Revenue also remained stable, and at $104.75 million is Q2, is even up slightly from Q4 of last year.Maintaining revenues and profits makes it easy to maintain the dividend. DOC has a 7-year history of keeping up its dividend, and the current payment of 23 cents per common share quarterly gives an annualized payment of 92 cents and a yield of 5%.Covering the stock for B. Riley FBR, analyst Craig Kucera sees DOC as both a strong player in its own right and a harbinger for its sector.“…the portfolio performed quite well in 2Q20 and DOC has not taken any bad debt reserves as it expects the small number of tenants who have yet to pay 2Q20 rent to pay in fairly short order. 2Q20 results were ahead of expectations, and we anticipate management to build on its investment pipeline of acquisitions, new developments and mezzanine investments over the next several quarters… Given the strength of cash collections thus far in the healthcare REIT space relative to other REIT sectors and a rapidly opening healthcare economy, we anticipate multiple expansion in the sector,” Kucera wrote. To this end, Kucera rates DOC a Buy along with with a $21 price target. That target implies 14% growth from current levels. (To watch Kucera’s track record, click here)Overall, DOC’s Moderate Buy consensus rating is based on 7 Buys and 3 Holds. Shares are currently trading for $18.42, and the $20 average target suggests a 9% upside. (See DOC stock analysis on TipRanks)LyondellBasell (LYB)Last on today’s list is LyondellBasell, a multinational global chemical company, with corporate offices in the Netherlands, the UK, and Texas. LyondellBasell is the world’s largest owner of polyethylene and polypropylene technologies, and derives much income from licensing their production. The company is also heavily involved in the ethylene, propylene, and polyolefin markets.The economic shutdown – imposed against the coronavirus – hit hard at industrial manufacturers in the 1H20. LYB saw financial results drop sharply in both Q1 and Q2. Quarterly revenues fell from $8.2 billion at the end of 2019 to $5.6 billion in 2Q20, while EPS dropped from $1.91 to 71 cents over the same period. There are two positive notes: Q2 earnings beat the forecast by 16%, and the outlook for Q3 shows a sharp turn upward, with EPS forecast at $1.20.Earlier this month, LYB paid out its dividend at $1.05 per common share. This marked the seventh consecutive quarter that the dividend has been paid at this level – it is important to note that the company did not cut or suspend its the payment, even during the height of the corona crisis. At the current level, the dividend annualizes to $4.20 per common share, and gives a yield of 5.58%.Joining the bulls, JPMorgan analyst Jeffrey Zekauskas has upgraded his stance on LYB shares from Neutral to Overweight (i.e. Buy). His $88 indicates a 15% upside potential for the coming year. (To watch Zekauskas’ track record, click here)In his comments on the stock, Zekauskas pointed out that the social lockdown policies have worked in the company’s favor.“Domestic polyethylene (PE) demand has been growing in 2020 despite the recession and the quarantines, and the US producers have been successfully addressing the export markets. The effects of strong growth in the consumer and packaging markets have more than offset contraction in the industrial sectors… We think the efficient way of investing in the effects of these trends and changes in the petrochemical industry over the coming year is through Lyondell,” Zekauskas opined. Overall, LYB shares have a Moderate Buy from the analyst consensus, based on 11 reviews that include 4 Buys and 8 Holds. The shares are selling for $76.55 and have recently appreciated right through the average price target of $74.60. Is Zekauskas’ upgrade on the stock a harbinger of more to come? This is one that bears watching. (See LYB stock analysis on TipRanks)To find good ideas for stocks trading at attractive valuations, visit TipRanks’ Best Stocks to Buy, a newly launched tool that unites all of TipRanks’ equity insights.Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the featured analysts. The content is intended to be used for informational purposes only. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any investment.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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What it’s like to stay at a Hilton, Marriott and Hyatt hotel during the COVID-19 pandemic

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What it's like to stay at a Hilton, Marriott and Hyatt hotel during the COVID-19 pandemic

WASHINGTON — Salivating at the buffet table, eagerly awaiting your sizzling omelette to be done. Cramming into a crowded elevator with a long weekend’s worth of luggage in tow. Debating if you should go for the Peanut M&M’s or Twix minibar purchase.

None of these quintessential hotel moments happened during my three nights staying at hotels in Washington, D.C., this month, and it doesn’t take a public health degree to know why: the coronavirus pandemic.

The pandemic has slaughtered the travel industry, as I’ve written for months now, leaving four out of 10 hotel workers unemployed, more than a thousand hotels still closed and occupancy rates decimated.

We’ll get to this: Is it safe to stay in a hotel amid the coronavirus pandemic?

I wasn’t comfortable staying in a hotel in mid-March, and felt the same through July, despite assurances from the hospitality industry about its cleanliness measures and guests. By August, Washington’s low positivity rate and my burgeoning curiosity inspired me to mask up and see for myself.

The city’s hotel occupancy rate has been below the national average and hasn’t gone past 40% the last four weeks according to STR data, suggesting social distancing wouldn’t be difficult.

Many hand sanitizing wipes, meals and mirror selfies later, I’m here to tell you that staying in a hotel during the coronavirus pandemic felt generally safe, with the caveat that these three hotels don’t wholly represent their respective brands nor the industry at large.

‘Do you belong here?’: Lawsuits allege Hilton, other hotels discriminated against Black guests

Six months of carnage and counting: Travel industry struggles to rebound from COVID-19

Hilton ‘CleanStay’ labels in place, but so-so on masks

I called ahead to see if I could get an early check-in at the Hilton Garden Inn in downtown Washington, and arrived just after noon. What stuck out to me most during my stay was the lack of diligent mask wearing from both staff and guests.

Hilton’s CleanStay label made me trust my room was, indeed, clean.

Were people wearing masks? Yes and no. Not a great sign to walk in and have the front desk manager not wearing his mask, even behind the plexiglass barrier. I saw a mask on the desk once I approached the station. The screen seemed a safe enough risk mitigation effort for me, though it is Hilton’s policy that all guests and employees wear face coverings in indoor public areas of the hotel. 

“We take the safety of everyone entering our hotel very seriously and, consistent with District of Columbia requirements, have signage throughout the property stating that employees and guests should wear masks in public areas,” Lee Seiler, the hotel’s general manager, told USA TODAY in a statement on behalf of the franchisee. “We will act on your feedback and ensure our employees understand the importance of this policy.” This Hilton Garden Inn is independently owned and managed. 

“We expect this policy to be implemented, like all things we do, by leading with hospitality,” Hilton corporate spokesperson Nigel Glennie told USA TODAY. This includes telling guests about the face covering policy before they arrive; reminding guests and visitors of the policy if they don’t have face coverings; and offering them a face covering for free if they don’t have one.

“That said, we also understand how challenging enforcing these rules can be for our team members, so have provided de-escalation training to help them diffuse challenging interactions and reach a great outcome for our guests,” Glennie added.

Weaving through floors, I noticed a mix of personnel and guests with and without masks.

Tiara Poole, 23, of Severn, Maryland, and Sunny Gordass, 24, of Capitol Heights, Maryland, were some of the only people I saw in the restaurant and bar area that doubles as extended lobby seating. Neither was wearing a mask as they had removed them to take pictures but quickly put them on when I approached.

The couple took a local vacation in celebration of Poole’s birthday and ventured throughout town during their stay. “We walked around, went to (restaurant) Founding Farmers then we saw (the Black Lives Matter plaza),” Gordass said. “It’s pretty cool seeing that in person.”

Was there social distancing? I felt comfortable given how few people were around. Signs encouraged guests to social distance in the lobby and the (empty) gym; you could buy grab-and-go food options to the left of the main entrance. Some of these options included full-blown meals in the form of breakfast bags or frozen dinners, but you could also purchase beverages like wine and coffee. It beat the minibar in terms of offerings, but there’s something special about having a snack already in your room that I missed. 

This remote was clean, according to Hilton's CleanStay label.
This remote was clean, according to Hilton’s CleanStay label.

How clean was everything? The “CleanStay” label attached to the door inspired confidence. Guests know their room has been cleaned if this seal is not broken.

Hilton’s cleanliness measures include placing the sticker in between the door and wall of rooms. Its protocol also calls for disinfecting many surfaces in the room like light switches, handles and knobs, major bathroom surfaces and the remote control. The remote control in my room also included a “CleanStay” label. 

Hmm: Travelers are flocking to Airbnb, Vrbo more than hotels during COVID-19 pandemic. But why?

Marriott: Not ‘too many inconveniences because of COVID’

I immediately felt safer in this Courtyard by Marriott seeing the front desk person with a mask on. First impressions don’t necessarily hold that much weight all the time – but during a pandemic, I wanted to feel taken care of more than usual. I signed a form promising I wouldn’t host any parties and showed my ID through the plexiglass barrier instead of handing it to the staffer, reducing another potential point of contact.

Loved this personal greeting from this Marriott hotel in Washington. The Hyatt I stayed at offered a similar one.
Loved this personal greeting from this Marriott hotel in Washington. The Hyatt I stayed at offered a similar one.

Were people wearing masks? Hit or miss, again, for both guests and employees, despite its policy for guests and employees to wear them at all times. Those with masks lifted them up upon seeing another person. I spotted a pair of gentlemen with no masks in sight sitting in two lobby armchairs, and no one on staff seemed to notice or care. Was I glaring through my mask? Who can say.

“Our hotel requires everyone to wear masks in all indoor public areas and select outdoor spaces,” complex assistant general manager Togi Mahdere told USA TODAY. “We appreciate you alerting us to your concerns as feedback provides us with the opportunity to continue to enhance our services.”

Rasheem Rooke, 46, of Washington, D.C., also was taking a staycation to get away from “all the excitement and energy at home,” he told USA TODAY. 

He said that people had been wearing masks. “There have not been any issues with that. Coming and going, even getting in and out of the elevator or walking down the hallway,” he said.

And overall, how has he liked his hotel stay? “There haven’t been too many inconveniences because of COVID,” he said.

Get used to using your phone to check out menus the next time you stay at a hotel.
Get used to using your phone to check out menus the next time you stay at a hotel.

Was there social distancing? Again, given low occupancy rates and a lack of business travel, it was fairly easy to maintain distance. I rarely had to worry about sharing an elevator with someone, and when I did, the person was masked.

How clean was everything? The remote control covered in plastic in my room was encouraging. Its policy said there would be disinfecting wipes in my room, and I found two small ones by my soap and shampoo. Hand sanitizing stations were available throughout the hotel as advertised, too, including in elevator banks on guest floors. 

The end of the house party? Airbnb bans parties and events worldwide, caps occupancy at 16 guests

Hyatt staff masked up and hand sanitizing stations throughout

The lobby of the Grand Hyatt in downtown Washington struck me as easily the most gorgeous hotel (inside, anyway) of the ones I stayed in. But it also felt empty and sad. The employee who handed me my dinner seemed genuinely thrilled to see me, perhaps evident of limited guest interaction.

A hand sanitizing station at the Grand Hyatt in Washington, D.C.
A hand sanitizing station at the Grand Hyatt in Washington, D.C.

Were people wearing masks? Hit or miss, though staff were masked up. Two women, who were not guests, sat in the lobby with bandannas or gaiters lowered. This is against Hyatt’s policy, which requires masks in hotel indoor public areas and outdoor areas. Masks are also required when you leave your home in Washington.

Despite Hyatt’s policy requiring all people wear masks, “some guests may be exempt from this mandate, including guests with medical conditions, guests consuming food or beverages in restaurants, and children under the age of 2,” Majed Dawood-Farah, general manager of the Grand Hyatt Washington, told USA TODAY.

“We encourage guests to approach the front desk when they have questions regarding our hotel policies or concerns about their safety and wellbeing, so we may address their concerns immediately,” Dawood-Farah added.

Was there social distancing? Yes, given that few people took up the cavernous lobby. I found myself picturing a bustling convention hall, with people plopped down on couches, carelessly gabbing away mask-free. Different times, indeed.

I ordered meals by calling the front desk after viewing a menu via a QR code in my room located on my nightstand.

Eduard Katehakis, 24, of College Park, Maryland, was working on his computer in the lobby. He’s often worked from the hotel the past two years, and decided to have a staycation there after being impressed by employees’ cleaning prowess.

“It’s the best place to work just because there’s so much space in this lobby,” he said. “I like staying away from people.” He said there’s always someone cleaning.

For the most part people have been masked and distanced, he added. “I get very upset when people don’t just because I know that I’m doing my part,” he said.

Gyms at Washington, D.C., hotels encouraged social distancing.
Gyms at Washington, D.C., hotels encouraged social distancing.

How clean was everything? In front of the elevators on about a dozen floors I saw hand sanitizing stations, which boosted my confidence that the hotel took the pandemic as seriously as possible. Hyatt’s policy said these would appear “prominently” throughout the hotel, which was true.  

The fitness center had automatic lights, and the room illuminated brighter when I walked in, again, alone.

Once I checked out the food menu via the QR code, I could call down for breakfast or dinner (albeit during restricted hours). I placed my order with the front desk and picked up meals on a floor below the lobby from a masked employee.

Would I have preferred a make-your-own-waffle station? Yes, but in the COVID-19 era, I appreciated the commitment to safety.

In case a short-term rental is more your speed: Which country has the best ‘enhanced clean’ rating from Airbnb?

‘Feels like I’m dorming anyway’: Hotels housing college students in effort to social distance

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Hilton, Marriott, Hyatt hotel stays: How safe I felt amid COVID-19

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Taseko Mines: Florence Copper Permitting Update

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VANCOUVER, BC, Sept. 22, 2020 /CNW/ – Taseko Mines Limited (TSX: TKO) (NYSE American: TGB) (LSE: TKO) ("Taseko" or the "Company") is pleased to announce that its Florence Copper Project received overwhelming support at the public hearing held by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality ("ADEQ").

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Funding patch would avert shutdown through Dec. 11, fund Navy’s Columbia program

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Funding patch would avert shutdown through Dec. 11, fund Navy’s Columbia program

WASHINGTON ― House Democrats have filed a stopgap spending measure to avoid a government shutdown and keep the Department of Defense and other federal agencies operating through Dec. 11.

The continuing resolution would allow the Navy to begin detailed design and construction work on two Columbia-class ballistic missile submarines, but leaves out White House requests for Space Force and nuclear weapons programs.

The bill would also extend the window for reimbursing government contractors for costs related to COVID-19 through Dec. 11. Trade groups had urged lawmakers for an extension as the pandemic has, for defense firms, created weapons program slowdowns, temporary factory closures and cash flow problems, particularly for smaller companies.

The CR, expected to be taken up by the House this week, was released Monday by the House Appropriations Committee.

In addition to the $1.6 billion for the Columbia-class sub, the bill would bar the Pentagon from launching new start programs, and omits funding for several so-called anomalies the Trump administration requested.

Without congressional intervention, the Navy would not have the money or authorization to begin work on the boats the sea service announced in June as part of a planned $10.4 billion contract with General Dynamics Electric Boat.

The bill comes amid weeks of stalled negotiations on a new pandemic relief bill, but lead lawmakers have committed to reaching an agreement to avoid a government shutdown. While some Democrats sought a CR that would last into early 2021, party leaders offered a bill whose December deadline aligned with what Republicans wanted.

Defense officials and industry leaders had said they preferred a shorter continuing resolution, because they cannot start new programs or increase spending on existing priorities under the restrictions from previous fiscal year funding.

Still, Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., immediately rejected the House proposal in a tweet: “House Democrats’ rough draft of a government funding bill shamefully leaves out key relief and support that American farmers need. This is no time to add insult to injury and defund help for farmers and rural America.”

Defense industry worries Congress will punt budget deal into 2021

Failing to pass a CR would mean a government shutdown ahead of the Nov. 3 elections. Funding expires for the federal government on Sept. 30, the end of fiscal 2020.

With there bill’s release, House Democrats blamed Republicans, who control the Senate, for not passing appropriations bills as the Democrat-led House did earlier in the year.

“While the House did its job and passed bills funding nearly every government agency, Senate Republicans did not even begin the appropriations process. Because of their irresponsibility, a continuing resolution is sadly necessary,” said House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y.

“This clean continuing resolution keeps government open while giving Congress additional time to negotiate annual appropriations bills that will invest for the people.”

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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