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What JPMorgan Has To Say About Young Employees Working From Home

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What JPMorgan Has To Say About Young Employees Working From Home

JPMorgan Chase & Co (NYSE: JPM) says it has noticed a troubling pattern with its work-from-home employees, particularly those who are of a younger age, Bloomberg reported Monday.

What Happened: CEO Jamie Dimon told analysts Keefe, Bruyette & Woods in a private meeting that productivity was particularly affected on Mondays and Fridays, according to Bloomberg.

“The WFH lifestyle seems to have impacted younger employees [at JPMorgan], and overall productivity and ‘creative combustion’ has taken a hit,” KBW Managing Director Brian Kleinhanzl wrote to clients in a note, citing the meeting with Dimon.

JPMorgan spokesman Michael Fusco told Bloomberg that the productivity of employees was affected “in general, not just younger employees,” but added that younger workers “could be disadvantaged by missed learning opportunities” as they were not in offices.

Why It Matters: The New York-based lender informed most senior sales staff and trading employees that they would be required to return to offices by Sept. 21, Bloomberg noted.

Workers in other roles are reportedly being encouraged to return to their desks up to a maximum of half building capacity in New York.

CEOs across the corporate world have a different take on the work from home environment.

“I felt that, given a lot of our work could be done from home, it made sense for us to contribute to social distancing,” Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ: GOOGL) (NASDAQ: GOOG) CEO Sundar Pichai said in May in relation to the pandemic.

Amazon.com, Inc (NASDAQ: AMZN) CEO Jeff Bezos wrote in a note to employees in March, “Much of the essential work we do cannot be done from home.” The e-commerce giant purchased 900,000 square feet of office space in six cities in the United States last month.

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ: FB) has also been expanding its office space taking advantage of the pandemic. A company spokesperson said on the development that its offices are “vitally important to help accommodate anticipated growth and meet the needs of our employees that need or prefer to work from campus.”

Price Action: JPMorgan traded nearly 0.3% higher at $102.80 in the pre-market session on Tuesday.

See more from Benzinga

© 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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Investigators say they found thousands of child porn images in the home of a popular kids’ YouTuber

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Investigators say they found thousands of child porn images in the home of a popular kids' YouTuber
Science educator John Robert Krampf was indicted on child pornography charges.

  • A science educator whose YouTube channel “The Happy Scientist” taught children about science has been indicted on federal child pornography charges. 

  • Investigators allege that John Robert Krampf, 64, knowingly received and possessed pornographic content “involving a minor who had not attained 12 years of age,” court documents show. 

  • Dixie State University Police Chief Blair Barfuss, involved in the case in his capacity as a special agent on the FBI’s Child Exploitation Task Force, told Insider that Krampf admitted to “downloading multiple files of child abuse material.” 

  • Krampf began posting educational science videos online in 2006, after decades of touring the US to educate children about science through live shows. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 Related: Teen accused of revenge porn wins Kansas House primary

The science educator behind the popular children’s YouTube channel “The Happy Scientist” has been indicted on two federal child pornography charges.

John Robert Krampf, 64, has been charged with knowingly receiving and possessing pornographic material “involving a minor who had not attained 12 years of age,” according to the September 16 indictment, which was obtained by Insider. 

Investigators found “thousands upon thousands” of images and lewd videos of children while searching Krampf’s home in Kane County, Utah, Dixie State University Police Chief Blair Barfuss told the St. George News. Barfuss worked on the case in his capacity as an agent on the FBI’s Child Exploitation Task Force.

Barfuss said that based on the amount of footage and photos investigators discovered, Krampf “had apparently been doing this for a long time,” according to the St. George News. 

The indictment was part of a sting operation that led to a dozen arrests in St. George, Utah, the St. George News reported. 

Barfuss told Insider in an email that Krampf admitted to “downloading multiple files of child abuse material” when interviewed by investigators. Barfuss said that investigators “seized over twenty external hard drives from his residence” and sent all seized devices and files to the FBI’s Rocky Mounty Computer Forensic Lab. 

“We are currently following up on information obtained, and seeking input from the public, inquiring if Mr. Krampf may have been engaged in other illegal actions,” Barfuss said.

Receipt of child pornography has a five-year mandatory minimum with a penalty of up to 20 years, and possession of child pornography has a maximum 20-year sentence, according to Melodie Rydalch, the public information officer for the US Attorney’s Office in Utah. 

Krampf’s initial court appearance is set for September 28, court documents show.

Insider has reached out to Krampf via his website for comment. 

Kramp began posting videos online in 2006

In 2006, he started creating videos to post online in addition to his real-life educational shows, according to Krampf’s website. 

Krampf had millions of views on one of his YouTube videos, though the channel only had roughly 8,000 subscribers, according to The Daily Dot.

As of Thursday morning, Krampf’s YouTube channel was removed. Krampf’s videos were not available via the Internet Archive at press time. Insider has reached out to YouTube for comment. 

Krampf also created a website to organize and share his YouTube videos. The website breaks down videos by topic, including life science, Earth science, chemical science, and space science. 

The website, TheHappyScientist.com, offers more insight into Krampf’s personal life and upbringing.

Krampf had been educating children for decades, touring the US as ‘Mr. Electricity’

One page entitled “Who is Robert Krampf?” — calling himself by his middle name — says that a “monster movie” began his love for science education as a child.

“My lifelong love of science began when I was five years old,” Krampf wrote. “Like many five year olds, I was obsessed with dinosaurs.” According to the website, Krampf has previously worked with “famous paleontologists” and had a career in museum education, including working as an educator at the Memphis Pink Palace Museum. 

In 1987, Krampf began a traveling science education program, touring the US for seven years. He traveled with his wife from Key West, Florida to Seattle, Washington, according to his website, teaching “students and adults” about science.

A 1993 Los Angeles Times article highlighted his touring show, which was dubbed “Mr. Electricity.” His shows were recommended for children ages five and up, the LA Times reported. During his stint in Los Angeles, he would also “perform private shows for patients at Children’s Hospital of Orange County,” according to the LA Times. 

In 1994, he took a position at the Museum of Science and History in Jacksonville, Florida. But Florida Power and Light (FPL) contracted Krampf in 1997 to travel around Florida educating students, the website said. Insider has reached out to FPL for comment. 

The South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported on the show in 2000. “More than 100,000 students in approximately 200 public elementary schools will see his show in Florida in the 2000-2001 school year, as arranged by Florida Power & Light as part of its 75th anniversary celebration,” the Sun-Sentinel said. 

Madison Hall contributed reporting.

Read the original article on Insider

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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‘The Boys’ Spinoff in Development at Amazon Following Massive Season 2 Launch

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‘The Boys’ Spinoff in Development at Amazon Following Massive Season 2 Launch

“The Boys” could soon be getting a spinoff. Variety has learned that Amazon is fast-tracking development on a new iteration of the popular comic book series adaptation.

The news comes just under three weeks after the premiere of Season 2 of the series, which is based on The New York Times best-selling comic of the same name by Garth Ennis and Darick Robertson. The second season is airing weekly, while the first dropped all at once, with the finale set to air Oct. 9. According to Amazon, the second season had the most-watched global launch of an Amazon original series ever, with the episodes to date having grown the audience from Season 1 by 89%. It was renewed for a third season ahead of the Season 2 premiere while also adding an aftershow hosted by Aisha Tyler.

The spinoff is set at America’s only college exclusively for young adult superheroes (or “supes”) that is run by Vought International. It is described as an irreverent, R-rated series that explores the lives of hormonal, competitive supes as they put their physical, sexual, and moral boundaries to the test, competing for the best contracts in the best cities. Part college show, part Hunger Games — with all the heart, satire and raunch of “The Boys.”

Craig Rosenberg is writing the pilot and will serve as showrunner and executive producer under his overall deal with Sony Pictures Television, with Rosenberg currently serving as writer and executive producer on the original series. “The Boys” creator Eric Kripke will also executive produce along with “The Boys” executive producer Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg, and James Weaver of Point Grey Pictures. Original Film’s Neal H. Moritz and Pavun Shetty, who also executive produce “The Boys,” are also executive producers on the spinoff. Amazon Studios and Sony Pictures Television will produce.

The second season sees the titular vigilantes on the run and hunted by the supes. Hughie (Jack Quaid), Mother’s Milk (Laz Alonso), Frenchie (Tomer Capon) and Kimiko (Karen Fukuhara) are in hiding after the explosive events of the first season finale, while Butcher (Karl Urban) is off on his own for a bit. Meanwhile, Homelander (Antony Starr) is trying to expand his power in a few new ways and Starlight (Erin Moriarty) is trying to navigate her own place in the Seven as the group shifts. Stormfront (Aya Cash), a social-media savvy new supe, comes in with an agenda of her own, while a larger threat looms, leaving Vought seeking to capitalize on the nation’s paranoia

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State ballot measures to legalize cannabis add $9B to U.S. market: RPT

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State ballot measures to legalize cannabis add $9B to U.S. market: RPT

John Kagia, New Frontier Data Cheif Knowledge Officer, joins Yahoo Finance’s Zach Guzman to discuss the cannabis outlook amid COVID-19 and the 2020 Presidential election.

Video Transcript

ZACK GUZMAN: Cannabis enthusiasts will have to wait a little bit more here to see discussions about legalizing at the federal level take place in the House. A vote was originally scheduled for the Moore Act, which would move to legalize cannabis at the federal level as well as expunge some criminal records for people tied to cannabis offenses.

It’s mostly a symbolic vote, though. As– as the Senate remains Republican-controlled, not a lot of expectations for that to move past Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. But states themselves have quite a bit of power here to grow the US legal cannabis market. Five states in particular will let voters decide on that this November.

And one firm watching this play out says that it could add a total of $9 billion to the US cannabis market, and here to chat that with us is New Frontier Data’s Chief Knowledge Officer, the man behind the report, John Kagia joins us now. And, John, it’s good to be chatting with you again. I mean, $9 billion is a lot of money to boost here to the market size of cannabis here in the US. Talk to me about what you’re expecting should these ballot measures get voter approval.

JOHN KAGIA: So I think there’s a couple of reasons why we think this is going to be such a consequential year for cannabis in the US. One, you know, the– the fact that we have five states on the ballot, six that– six initiatives that are going to be voted on this November, makes this a pretty milestone year in terms of voters getting a voice in the status of cannabis in our society.

And there’s a couple of states which we’re paying particularly close attention to. We think Arizona’s adult use initiative is particularly important. You know, Arizona tried four years ago to legalize adult use. The vote lost by 2%– by 2 percentage points, and so this is going to be a return to the ballot. And with the demographic changes that we’ve seen in the state, the poll is actually looking better for legalization this year.

Second is New Jersey. New Jersey is going to be a phenomenally consequential market for the East Coast. If you think about the proximity of the state to New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and other mid-Atlantic states, we think in and of itself New Jersey is going to be a huge market. But once you add in that regional element to it, the state could be earning, you know, nearly $2 billion, $1.8 billion by 2025. So a huge market and a huge marker for the East Coast.

And then a third state that I think is interesting to watch because we’ve never seen this happen before is South Dakota, which is the first state that we have seen that is putting on the ballot both a medical and an adult use legalization initiative at the same time.

And what that tells us is, while we have historically seen pretty long lags between the presentation of a medical measure and then that state transitioning to adult use, South Dakota is the first state which is trying to do both of those at once. And I think it just reflects this kind of growing momentum social acceptance and public shift in attitudes that we’re seeing around this issue.

ZACK GUZMAN: It’s also a red state and a pretty confidently put red state. I mean, we’ve seen that state go red– you know, you can go back a long time, decades we’re talking here in terms of how red South Dakota is. But, I mean, talk to me about maybe how that represents the shift here in cannabis as well.

Because in– in this pandemic, we’ve heard from a number of analysts talking about how states are desperate to make up revenue, lost revenue, and how cannabis in a lot of these states would– would represent a pretty big opportunity here to bring that in. I mean, how much does that pressure along with a lot of the criminal justice reform aspects we’ve been discussing here in 2020, when you put those two things together, talk to me about the momentum that you’ve seen play out over the last couple of years on that front.

JOHN KAGIA: That’s a great question, and I think a really important part in understanding why we’re seeing these dramatic shifts. So historically, cannabis has been viewed as a largely liberal issue. So you saw legalization happen first in the Western states, which have historically been blue, and then in the Northeast, which is also historically a blue region.

But what’s notable about this election cycle is we’re starting to see– or we’re continuing to see this momentum building within traditionally historically conservative states, whether that’s Arizona, Mississippi, Montana, and South Dakota. And it’s that convergence, one, the– the general’s public’s acceptance now that medical cannabis is broadly perceived to have therapeutic value. I think that is largely settled in the American public opinion.

About 90% of Americans believe medical cannabis has value. So this is much less of a– a left-right issue. I think the science is a firm support for it. Second is the growing public awareness of the– the inequities in cannabis prohibition. The ACLU recently updated its “Cannabis in Black and White” report, which shows the racial discrepancies in prohibition enforcement.

And Black cannabis consumers, even though they consume at the same rates as white cannabis consumers, are still nearly four times more likely to be arrested for cannabis offenses, and in some states nearly 10 times more likely. And as folks are looking at those numbers, they’re just– you know, the inequity of– of that– those prosecutions, particularly given the national debate that we’re having right now on policing, I think is ringing loudly and resonating loudly with a lot of people.

ZACK GUZMAN: [INAUDIBLE]

JOHN KAGIA: When–

ZACK GUZMAN: Sorry, go ahead.

JOHN KAGIA: Yeah, the economics of cannabis. At a time when COVID has so acutely hurt state and local budgets, you know, there’s a lot more open consideration for things that might historically have been problematic. And so I think you’re seeing much more receptivity to the idea of legalizing cannabis when you look at a state like Colorado, which, in its first six years of legalization, generated nearly $80 billion in sales.

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Christine founded Sports Grind Entertainment with an aim to bring relevant and unaltered Sports news to the general public with a specific view point for each story catered by the team. She is a proficient journalist who holds a reputable portfolio with proficiency in content analysis and research.

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